FAQS

Before the Home inspection

​​What is a home inspection?

A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a house, from the roof to the foundation.

What does a home inspection include?

The standard home inspector’s report will cover the condition of the home’s heating system; central air conditioning system (temperature permitting); interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement and structural components. For more info please see our Standards of Practice.

Why do I need a home inspection?

Buying a home could be the largest single investment you will ever make. To minimize unpleasant surprises and unexpected difficulties, you’ll want to learn as much as you can about the newly constructed or existing house before you buy it. A home inspection may identify the need for major repairs or builder oversights, as well as the need for maintenance to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will know more about the house, which will allow you to make decisions with confidence.

What will it cost?

There are a couple factors determining rate. Size of home, tests being done and distance. We are more than happy to discuss this with you over the phone or via text. The sense of security and knowledge gained from an inspection is well worth the cost, and the lowest-priced inspection is not necessarily a bargain. Use the inspector’s qualifications, including experience, training, and professional affiliations as a guide. We are an affiliate of the Salt Lake Board of Realtors, The Utah Real Estate Inspectors guild and a member of InterNACHI. Pricing can now be found under our schedule an inspection section.

Can a house fail a home inspection?

No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value. It is not a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what components and systems may need major repair or replacement.

When do I call a home inspector?

Typically, a home inspector is contacted immediately after the contract or purchase agreement has been signed. The term you might here is "under contract". Before you sign, be sure there is an inspection clause in the sales contract, making your final purchase obligation contingent on the findings of a professional home inspection. This clause should specify the terms and conditions to which both the buyer and seller are obligated.

What do I need to have ready when I schedule the inspection?

  • NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE NUMBER AND EMAIL ADDRESS
  • SELLERS DISCLOSURE IF AVAILABLE
  • NAME OF PERSON THAT REFERRED YOU

Day of Inspection

Do I have to be there?

While it’s not required that you be present for the inspection, it is highly recommended. It really depends on the situation. What we find works best is to come in and perform the inspection at a specified time. After the inspection is completed we meet with our client and walk them through the property explaining our findings and what they'll see on the report. This gives the potential buyers an opportunity to ask any questions of us or the sellers.

Should I walk around the house with you?

Absolutely. We're happy to explain everything we're looking at. There will be times where we need to focus and evaluate, but feel free to tag along and ask questions.

Can my agent be there too?

Yes! Agents are encouraged to be there and be engaged so they can know what they're writing up in your Repair Request Addendum.

The Report

What should I be looking for?

Our reports have lots of images to help you recall what you're looking at. We break down my reports into areas that are safety hazards and other recommended items to fix/ask for.

The summary will be the most helpful area of the report, right at the top.

What if the report reveal problems?

No house is perfect. If we identify problems, it doesn’t mean you should or shouldn’t buy the house, only that you will know in advance what to expect. If your budget is tight, or if you don’t want to become involved in future repair work, this information will be important to you. If major problems are found, a seller may agree to make repairs.

Will there be recommendations on who to call?

With each defect we include which type of contractor you will need to search for to get quotes.

Follow-up

Can I call you if I have questions after the I get the report?

Absolutely. This is one of our favorite parts. Call, text or email.

Contractors

We have a few contractors that we've worked with in the past that we can recommend. We still recommend you contact at least 3 in each area for quotes and do your own research.